storyboard

Monumental Moment In My Writing Career

on January 25, 2013

UTtC storyboardFor every book I write, I create a storyboard. Around that storyboard, I post inspirational images for the characters, setting, or even a specific scene. I’m convinced I couldn’t write a book without a storyboard, which is what makes last night a monumental moment in my writing career. You see, so long as a book is still in process, the board stays up. I have three of them on my bedroom walls. (The one for book 2 in the Anchor Island series is to the right.)

Make that had.

When you’re a writer and still trying to sell, your books are always in process. You’re always revising or thinking of revising or it’s put away to be revamped in a year. No matter when you get around to it, you’ll need that storyboard. Well, I will. Which is why a board has never come down… until now.

MTB post itsMEANT TO BE will hit shelves in May and as of right now, it’s pretty much done. I get one more pass at it but for all intents and purposes, the book is as done as it will ever be. And that is weird. The picture to the left is what’s left of that storyboard. There are about 40 (or more) post its there. Seems odd to throw them away.

I’ve never had to watch my child leave the nest, but I’m guessing this is how it must feel. Not sure if I’m happy or sad or just nostalgic for the characters. Good thing I get to spend two more books with them (even if in lesser roles.)

From the reader stand point, have you ever gotten to the end of a book and not wanted to leave those characters? (I know many would just dive back in and read the book again, but I’m not a re-reader.) I have felt this many times. Mostly with the families that Nora Roberts created over the years. From Ireland to the Chesapeake Bay to Three Sisters Island. I could have stayed in those worlds forever.